PAULA CONLON

PAULA CONLON is a frequent presenter on her specialty, the Native American flute. From 1996 to 2017, Dr. Conlon taught Native American and world music at the University of Oklahoma’s School of Music. For two decades, she attended and participated at numerous Native American music and dance events across former Indian Territory, and she incorporated these first-hand experiences into her teaching, writing, and research presentations. Dr. Conlon is currently an independent scholar working out of her hometown, Ottawa, Canada. Email: pconlon@ou.edu

Native American flute

This research examines the Native American flute tradition, focusing on Comanche artist and flute player Doc Tate Nevaquaya (1932-1996) whose seminal 1979 recording, Comanche Flute Music Played by Doc Tate Nevaquaya, was re-released as a CD by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings SFW CD 50403 in 2004.

– Conlon, Paula J (2017) “The Native American Flute Tradition in the Southern Plains, Focusing on the Kiowa and Comanche Tribes,” In Flower World: Music Archaeology of the Americas, vol. 5, Matthias Stockli and Mark Howell (Eds.), 103-121, Berlin: Ekho Verlag.
– Conlon, Paula (2014) “Nevaquaya: Joyce Lee Doc Tate,” In Grove Dictionary of American Music, 2nd edition, Charles Hiroshi Garrett (Editor in Chief), NY: Oxford University Press.
– Conlon, Paula (2014) “Courtship Rituals and the Native American Flute,” In Music, Dance and the Art of Seduction, Frank Kouwenhoven and James Kippen (Eds.), 103-14, The University of Chicago Press.
– Conlon, Paula (2014) “Nevaquaya: Joyce Lee Doc Tate;” In Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments, 2nd edition, Richard Haefer (Editor), NY: Oxford University Press.
-Conlon, Paula (2014) “Bending or breaking the Native American flute tradition?,” In Oxford Handbook of Music Revival, Caroline Bithell and Juniper Hill (Eds.), 442-65, NY: Oxford University Press.
– Conlon, Paula (2012) “The Native American Flute: Convergence and Collaboration as Exemplified by R. Carlos Nakai,” In – the world of music – Readings in Ethnomusicology, Max Peter Baumann (Ed.), 118-33, Berlin: VWB – Verlag für Wissenschaft und Bildung (reprint of Conlon, Paula (2002) “The Native American Flute: Convergence and Collaboration as Exemplified by R. Carlos Nakai,” In Indigenous Popular Music in North America: Continuations and Innovations, Karl Neuenfeldt (Ed.), The World of Music wom 44, 2002-1: 61-74.)
– Conlon, Paula (2009) “Nevaquaya, Joyce Lee “Doc” Tate,” In Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, vol. 2, Dianna Everett (Ed.), Oklahoma City: Oklahoma Historical Society: 1014, http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/N/NE004.
– Conlon, Paula (2007) “Comanche Flute Music Played by Doc Tate Nevaquaya, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings SFW CD 50403,” In Journal of American Folklore 120 (475): 77-79.
– Conlon, Paula (2007) “Doc Tate Nevaquaya – Master Comanche Flute Player,” In Flute Focus 12: 4-5.

 

Powwow music and dance

This research focuses on Southern Plains powwow singing based on personal fieldwork in Oklahoma from 1996 to 2017, including participation at Southern Plains powwow singing sessions held at the Jacobson House Native Art Center in Norman, Oklahoma.

– Conlon, Paula (2013) “From Powwow to Stomp Dance: Parallel Dance Traditions in Oklahoma,” In Oxford Handbook of Dance and Ethnicity, Anthony Shay and Barbara Sellers-Young (Eds.), oxfordhandbooks.com.
– Conlon, Paula and Paul McKenzie-Jones (2013) “Red Power: American Indian Activism through Powwow Music and Dance,” In Sounds of Resistance: The Role of Music in Multicultural Activism, Vol. 1, Activism in the United States. Eunice Rojas and Lindsay Michie Eades (Eds.), 21-46, Santa Barbara, CA: ABC/CLIO.
– Conlon, Paula (2009) “Dance, American Indian,” In Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, vol. 1, Dianna Everett (Ed.), Oklahoma City: Oklahoma Historical Society: 385-86, http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/D/DA008.
– Barry, Nancy and Paula Conlon (2003) “Native American Music in the Classroom,” In Music Educators Journal 90 (2): 21-26.

Native American stomp dance

This research looks at contemporary Native American stomp dancing as it occurs in Oklahoma, based on personal fieldwork conducted from 1996 to 2017, and a comparison of these dances with historical accounts of the stomp dance, both in Oklahoma and in the southeastern area of North America where it originated.

– Conlon, Paula (2013) “From Powwow to Stomp Dance: Parallel Dance Traditions in Oklahoma,” In Oxford Handbook of Dance and Ethnicity, Anthony Shay and Barbara Sellers-Young (Eds.), oxfordhandbooks.com.
– Conlon, Paula (2007) “Diaspora in Indian Territory: Stomp Dancing in Oklahoma,” In Folk Music, Traditional Music, Ethnomusicology: Canadian Perspectives, Past and Present. Anna Hoefnagels and Gordon E. Smith (Eds.), 212-220, Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Inuit drum dance

This research focuses on Iglulik Inuit drum dancing, based on personal fieldwork on Baffin Island, Canada in 1985 and a study of ethnographic material on Inuit drum-dancing in the eastern Arctic region of North America.

– Conlon, Paula (2010) “Iglulik Inuit Drum Dance: Past, Present, and Future,” In Imaginations and Beyond: Proceedings of the Eighth Native American Symposium November 4-62009, Mark B. Spencer (Ed.), 140-143, Durant, Oklahoma: Southeastern Oklahoma State University.
– Conlon, Paula (2009) “Iglulik Inuit Drum-Dance Songs,” In Music of the First Nations: Tradition and Innovation in Native North America. Tara Browner (Ed.), 7-20, Urbana: University of Illinois Press.
– Conlon, Paula (2007) “Iglulik Inuit Drum Dance,” In Native Dance,  http://www.nativedance.ca/
Nattiez, Jean-Jacques (2004) Songs of the Iglulik Inuit: Canada. 2004, Witness World PG 1107, Barcelona, Spain: Blue Moon Producciones Discograficas, DL B-47952/04 (CD liner notes – Paula Conlon, research and 1985 recordings)

Suggested web sites on Native American flute:
http://flutetree.com/
http://flutopedia.com/